Myths about Exercising and Aging:



Myth: There’s no point to exercising. I’m going to get old anyway.



Fact: Exercise and strength training helps you look and feel younger and stay active longer. Regular physical activity lowers your risk for a variety of conditions, including Alzheimer’s, heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.



Myth: Older people shouldn’t exercise. They should save their strength and rest.



Fact: Research shows that a sedentary lifestyle leads to more hospitalizations, doctor visits and use of medicines for illness.



Myth: Exercise puts me at risk for falling down.



Fact: Regular exercise, by building strength and stamina, prevents loss of bone mass and improves balance, actually reducing your risk of falling!


My favorite day of the week to exercise is always tomorrow!

Balancing Food & Physical Activity

Maintaining a healthy weight is not easy! In a world full of quick fixes and fad diets, the emphasis is not about healthy eating. To keep a healthy weight, it is important to eat healthy and be active.

Eat a variety of foods

Choose a variety of foods every day; it is important to eat whole grains, fruits and vegetables, lean meats and low-fat dairy. All foods, including your favorites, fit in a healthy diet! Eat treats in moderation, keeping your serving size small.

Exercise Regularly

One of the most important steps in maintaining your weight is to balance what you eat and drink with physical activity. Older adults should incorporate aerobic activity, muscle-strengthening activity and balance training for those at risk for falls. Always talk to your doctor before starting a physical activity program.


Drink Plenty of Water

Drinking water keeps you hydrated without adding calories. Drink when you are thirsty, but try to drink more in hot weather or when exercising.

Eat Regular Meals

Eating breakfast helps you feel full throughout the day. Eating three smaller meals and a couple of healthy snacks may help you stay fueled throughout the day.